-Cuban Gar Aquaculture Experiments: Feeding Video–

-In preparation for our upcoming aquaculture experiments using Cuban gars (Atractosteus tristoechus) to evaluate sustainable feed, different filtration systems, and various water quality parameters, we had to condition the fish to a variety of feed types.  Here you can see a brief video* of the Cuban gars which have been conditioned to take pellet feed (in this case New Life Spectrum fish food).

The group has very recently been moved to the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources & Environment Fish Lab where we will begin our sustainable feed experiments in the near future.  It is relatively easy to train a large group of fish as opposed to an individual fish since they tend to “learn” from each other!–

*select “HD” for highest quality video

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-GAR-CON 2012 Preview…–

-Just a quick photographic preview of some of the things coming soon from “Gar-Con 2012” (International Network for Lepisosteid Research Conference 2012). Check out this tropical gar (Atractosteus tropicus) from the gar farm; much more to come!–

 

-Aquaculture of Tropical Gars in Mexico–

In anticipation of my upcoming trip to Villahermosa (Tabasco state, Mexico), here is a great video put together by colleagues at the tropical gar aquaculture farm (Otot-Ibam) highlighting their gar production. Great shots/sequences of gar development and the culture process. I’ll be presenting at the 4th International Meeting on Lepisosteid Research in mid-June, and we’ll get to tour the farm as well as participate in workshops.

Tropical gar (Atractosteus tropicus) Aquaculture

-Successful Captive Spawning of Alligator Gars at NSU!–

Research on alligator gars at Nicholls State University & LSU

Students (from left) Paige O’Malley, Matthew Moroney and Courtney Stauderman remove an alligator gar from a holding tank at the LSU AgCenter Aquaculture Research Station in Baton Rouge. The gar were spawned in holding tanks as part of a research project studying methods of rearing the fish in captivity.
Photo: Craig Gautreaux/LSU AgCenter